Almanac A members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics

Biography

Elected: 2008, 3rd term.

Born: July 10, 1956, Bronxville, NY

Home: Granite Bay

Education: U.C.L.A., B.A. 1978.

Professional Career: Newspaper columnist, journalist.

Ethnicity: White/Caucasian

Religion: Baptist

Family: married (Lori) , 2 children

Republican Tom McClintock, who was first elected in 2008, is one of the California delegation’s most conservative members, actively espousing his limited-government views in floor speeches, television interviews, and op-ed columns. “These elitists of the left think they are entitled to run our lives,” he said of Democrats in 2012.

McClintock spent his early childhood in White Plains, N.Y., where he lived until he was 9. His earliest exposure to politics came at a young age, when his mother took him to a campaign rally for Republican presidential candidate Richard Nixon at a local airport in 1960. After graduating from the University of California, Los Angeles, he worked briefly as a political columnist and a state Senate aide before leaping into elected office at age 26 with a successful run for the California Assembly in 1982. From his earliest days in the legislature, McClintock established himself as perhaps its most vocal, if not the most effective, budget hawk, railing against tax increases and high spending under Democratic and Republican administrations alike. Supporters saw an eloquent champion of conservative ideas, a policy wonk with a penchant for quoting Abraham Lincoln. Detractors viewed him as an ideological obstructionist with few legislative accomplishments.

McClintock tested the limits of his statewide appeal in a liberal California through a relentless effort to win higher office. His name has appeared on the ballot in every state election since 1982. He ran for state controller in 1994 and again in 2002, narrowly losing both times. In 2006, he was unsuccessful as his party’s nominee for lieutenant governor, even as Republican Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger sailed to reelection. But no race elevated McClintock’s profile in the state as much as his quixotic campaign for governor in the 2003 recall election. As star-struck Republicans lined up behind former actor Schwarzenegger, McClintock forged ahead, presenting himself as the true Republican in a field of hopefuls that at one point included political commentator Arianna Huffington and actor Gary Coleman. He finished with 13%.

Opportunity struck yet again for McClintock in 2008. In February, after nine-term Republican Rep. John Doolittle announced he would step down from the 4th District seat amid a federal probe of disgraced Republican lobbyist Jack Abramoff, several Republicans in the district urged McClintock to run. He faced an intense, three-month primary campaign against former Rep. Doug Ose, a Republican moderate who held the neighboring 3rd District seat from 1999 to 2005. Ose attacked McClintock as a career politician and carpetbagger, although Ose also lived outside the district. McClintock, who noted that he had lived in the district’s Sacramento suburbs while serving in the legislature, ran ads branding Ose as a liberal who had voted to raise taxes and had earmarked millions of dollars for federal projects in his district. McClintock won the primary 54%-39% over Ose.

In the general election, McClintock faced Democrat Charlie Brown, a retired Air Force officer who came within 10,000 votes of beating Doolittle in 2006. Brown, who raised his family in the Sacramento suburb of Roseville, renewed criticism of McClintock as an opportunist who didn’t live in the district. McClintock ran ads calling attention to Brown’s attendance at a 2005 protest by Code Pink, the fiercely anti-war group, and asserted that Brown supported gay marriage but not the troops in Iraq. McClintock’s expected easy victory actually took weeks to unfold. He won by precisely 1,800 votes, 50.2%-49.8%, and took six of the nine counties.

In the House, McClintock has proven to be a faithful conservative vote, though an occasionally nettlesome one to GOP leaders seeking to limit internal dissent. He joined the Tea Party Caucus in 2010. “The bigger government gets, the more it takes from working folks,” he told Fox News that year. “And the more it takes from working folks, the worse the economy does.” He promised to eschew earmarks, the funding requests that members tack onto major spending bills for special projects in their districts, and called for the earmarking process to be abolished instead of simply reformed.

McClintock introduced several unsuccessful amendments to slash funding, including one in June 2012 to eliminate the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy program at the Department of Energy and to direct the $1.45 billion in savings toward deficit reduction. A month earlier, he was among a group of conservatives who voted against a House-passed bill to extend the life of the Export-Import Bank of the United States, blasting it for subsidizing aerospace giant Boeing Co., which he sarcastically called “that plucky little upstart.” He angered Bay Area Democrats when he got the House to pass an amendment to the transportation bill that prevented funding for a subway project for San Francisco’s Muni public transit system.

In 2011, McClintock became the chairman of the Water and Power Subcommittee of the Natural Resources Committee. On the panel, he has complained that about half of the state’s water supply is consumed to meet various environmental regulations, a particular problem during the state’s frequent droughts. He was among the Golden State Republicans who worked on a House-passed bill in 2012 that directed the federal government to extract water from Northern California farms, fisheries, and cities to send to farmers further south. The legislation drew substantial complaints from Democrats and did not move in the Senate.

Redistricting after the 2010 census pushed the 4th District further south but kept it firmly Republican. In the 2012 primary, McClintock was spared a challenge from fellow GOP Rep. Dan Lungren, who ultimately ran and lost in the 7th District, and in the general election, he easily beat Democrat Jack Uppal with 61% of the vote.

Office Contact Information

MAIN OFFICE

(202) 225-2511

(202) 225-5444

RHOB- Rayburn House Office Building Room 2331
Washington, DC 20515-0504

MAIN OFFICE

(202) 225-2511

(202) 225-5444

RHOB- Rayburn House Office Building Room 2331
Washington, DC 20515-0504

DISTRICT OFFICE

(916) 786-5560

(916) 786-6364

2200A Douglas Boulevard Suite 240
Roseville, CA 95661

DISTRICT OFFICE

(916) 786-5560

(916) 786-6364

2200A Douglas Boulevard Suite 240
Roseville, CA 95661

CAMPAIGN OFFICE

2200B Douglas Boulevard Unit 130
Roseville, CA 95661

CAMPAIGN OFFICE

2200B Douglas Boulevard Unit 130
Roseville, CA 95661

Staff

Sort by: Interest Name Title

Abortion

Rachel Long
Office Manager; Scheduler; Legislative Assistant

Aerospace

Brittany Madni
Legislative Assistant

Agriculture

Brittany Madni
Legislative Assistant

Appropriations

Chris Tudor
Legislative Director

Steven Koncar
Senior Legislative Assistant

Brittany Madni
Legislative Assistant

Adam Pugh
Legislative Correspondent

adam.pugh@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-2511

Rachel Long
Office Manager; Scheduler; Legislative Assistant

Banking

Chris Tudor
Legislative Director

Budget

Chris Tudor
Legislative Director

Brittany Madni
Legislative Assistant

Campaign

Rachel Long
Office Manager; Scheduler; Legislative Assistant

Commerce

Steven Koncar
Senior Legislative Assistant

Education

Rachel Long
Office Manager; Scheduler; Legislative Assistant

Energy

Steven Koncar
Senior Legislative Assistant

Environment

Chris Tudor
Legislative Director

Steven Koncar
Senior Legislative Assistant

Family

Rachel Long
Office Manager; Scheduler; Legislative Assistant

Finance

Chris Tudor
Legislative Director

Brittany Madni
Legislative Assistant

Foreign

Steven Koncar
Senior Legislative Assistant

Brittany Madni
Legislative Assistant

Govt Ops

Rachel Long
Office Manager; Scheduler; Legislative Assistant

Grants

Rachel Long
Office Manager; Scheduler; Legislative Assistant

Gun Issues

Steven Koncar
Senior Legislative Assistant

Health

Steven Koncar
Senior Legislative Assistant

Brittany Madni
Legislative Assistant

Homeland Security

Chris Tudor
Legislative Director

Housing

Chris Tudor
Legislative Director

Human Rights

Steven Koncar
Senior Legislative Assistant

Immigration

Steven Koncar
Senior Legislative Assistant

Intelligence

Chris Tudor
Legislative Director

Judiciary

Steven Koncar
Senior Legislative Assistant

Labor

Steven Koncar
Senior Legislative Assistant

Brittany Madni
Legislative Assistant

Adam Pugh
Legislative Correspondent

adam.pugh@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-2511

Land Use

Chris Tudor
Legislative Director

Medicare

Steven Koncar
Senior Legislative Assistant

Brittany Madni
Legislative Assistant

Military

Chris Tudor
Legislative Director

Public Works

Chris Tudor
Legislative Director

Science

Brittany Madni
Legislative Assistant

Adam Pugh
Legislative Correspondent

adam.pugh@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-2511

Small Business

Brittany Madni
Legislative Assistant

Tax

Chris Tudor
Legislative Director

Brittany Madni
Legislative Assistant

Technology

Brittany Madni
Legislative Assistant

Adam Pugh
Legislative Correspondent

adam.pugh@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-2511

Telecommunications

Chris Tudor
Legislative Director

Rachel Long
Office Manager; Scheduler; Legislative Assistant

Trade

Steven Koncar
Senior Legislative Assistant

Transportation

Chris Tudor
Legislative Director

Veterans

Steven Koncar
Senior Legislative Assistant

Adam Pugh
Legislative Correspondent

adam.pugh@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-2511

Election Results

2012 GENERAL
Tom McClintock
Votes: 197,803
Percent: 61.11%
Jack Uppal
Votes: 125,885
Percent: 38.89%
2012 PRIMARY
Tom McClintock
Votes: 114,311
Percent: 64.79%
Jack Uppal
Votes: 62,130
Percent: 35.21%
2010 GENERAL
Tom McClintock
Votes: 186,397
Percent: 61.27%
Clint Curtis
Votes: 95,653
Percent: 31.44%
Benjamin Emery
Votes: 22,179
Percent: 7.29%
2010 PRIMARY
Tom McClintock
Votes: 89,443
Percent: 78.48%
Michael Babich
Votes: 24,528
Percent: 21.52%
2008 GENERAL
Tom McClintock
Votes: 185,790
Percent: 50.24%
Charlie Brown
Votes: 183,990
Percent: 49.76%
2008 PRIMARY
Tom McClintock
Votes: 51,655
Percent: 53.46%
Doug Ose
Votes: 37,802
Percent: 39.12%
Suzanne Jones
Votes: 4,920
Percent: 5.09%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (61%), 2008 (50%)

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