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After Criticism, Supers to Meet Publicly Again After Criticism, Supers to Meet Publicly Again After Criticism, Supers to Meet Publicly Again After Criticism, Supers t...

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After Criticism, Supers to Meet Publicly Again

The Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction, also known as the "super committee," led by Co-Chairs Rep. Jeb Hensarling, R-Texas, and Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., center, meets on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2011, to hear from Congressional Budget Office Director Douglas Elmendorf about the national debt. From left are, Rep. Fred Upton, R-Mich., Rep. Xavier Becerra, D-Calif., Hensarling, Murray, Senate Minority Whip Jon Kyl of Ariz., Senate Finance Committee Chairman Sen. Max Baucus, D-Mont., Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., and Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Pa. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)](AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

photo of Billy House
October 19, 2011

The deficit-reduction super committee will hold a public hearing next Wednesday on security and non-security discretionary spending—only its fourth public event.

(RELATED: Key Dates for the Super Committee)

The 10 a.m. hearing will feature more testimony from Congressional Budget Office Director Doug Elmendorf. He testified last month at a hearing that looked into the history of the nation’s debt and the forces behind that.

 

The panel of 12 Republicans and Democrats, formally called the Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction and charged with finding at least $1.2 trillion in savings over 10 years by Nov. 23, also publicly held its initial organizational meeting.

(RELATED: Super Committee Meets with Gang of Six)

But the lack of more frequent public meetings by the committee--and the continuation of its nearly daily closed-door sessions--has caused grumbling from more and more sources, including fellow members of Congress.

 

 

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