Skip Navigation

Close and don't show again.

Your browser is out of date.

You may not get the full experience here on National Journal.

Please upgrade your browser to any of the following supported browsers:

N2K Presidential Race: Rick Santorum, Buckeye Boy N2K Presidential Race: Rick Santorum, Buckeye Boy

NEXT :
This ad will end in seconds
 
Close X

Not a member? Learn More »

Forget Your Password?

Don't have an account? Register »

Reveal Navigation
 

 

N2K Presidential Race

N2K Presidential Race: Rick Santorum, Buckeye Boy

+

Rick Santorum is hoping Buckeye state Republicans embrace his candidacy.(AP Photo/Eric Gay)

CHILLICOTHE, Ohio -- Rick Santorum didn’t live, become governor, or own a house here, but he’s nonetheless claiming the Buckeye State as his own.

The former U.S. senator from Pennsylvania, born not far from Pittsburgh, is intent on convincing Ohio voters he understands their values and concerns because he’s from the same region, if not the same state. During a speech on Friday in this town just south of Columbus, he repeatedly referenced his Keystone State roots.

“I come from southwest Pennsylvania,” he told an audience of several hundred jammed into the local high school gymnasium. “We understand how difficult the economy can be. We lived it. I came from a steel town.”

Ohio and Pennsylvania, particularly western Pennsylvania, are chock-full of working-class, culturally conservative voters hit hard by the manufacturing industry’s collapse—voters Santorum’s campaign has courted diligently.

With polls showing his lead over Mitt Romney all but evaporated in Ohio, Santorum is counting on a hometown edge this time around.

“He is like us,” said Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine, who introduced Santorum before his speech. “He is from Pennsylvania. He is from blue-collar background.” 

—Alex Roarty

 

 

NATIONAL JOURNAL’S PRIMARY REPORT

Poll: Romney Closes In on Santorum in Ohio  
[National Journal, 3/2/12] The race between Santorum and Romney is tightening in Ohio, Super Tuesday's most hotly contested race, according to a new Quinnipiac University poll released early Friday. Santorum now leads Romney, 35 percent to 31 percent, within the poll's margin of error of plus or minus 4.3 percentage points.

Seattle Times Supports Romney—By ‘Default'
[Seattle Times, 3/2/12] The Seattle Times reluctantly backed Romney in its Friday edition ahead of Washington state’s Saturday caucuses, calling him “the only option in a weak field.” The newspaper went after the candidate for his reluctance to talk about his business career, his stance on the auto bailout, and his avoidance of a foreign-policy discussion, but said he is “the practical choice” compared with the rest of the GOP options. Will this non-endorsement hurt Romney more than it helps him?

 

Gingrich: I Won’t Join the Team in Washington
[National Journal, 3/2/12] Taking a swipe at rival Santorum, Newt Gingrich said on Friday that he was “not going to Washington to join the team,” a reference to the former senator from Pennsylvania’s statement that sometimes you have to “take one for the team” when working in government. But the former House speaker’s assertion is a stretch of the facts in at least one respect.

Ohio’s Demographics Help Santorum
[Wall Street Journal, 3/1/12] According to 2008 primary exit polls, GOP voters who cast ballots in Ohio were less affluent, less educated, and more likely to live in rural areas and to be evangelical Christians than GOP voters in Michigan—all demographics where Santorum soundly beat Romney in Michigan’s primary on Tuesday.

Evangelical Voters Appear to be Up for Grabs in Washington State
[Seattle Times, 3/1/12] In 1988, Christian conservatives lifted televangelist Pat Robertson to a win in Washington's Republican caucuses. Four years ago, many local evangelicals backed Mike Huckabee's losing primary bid. But this year there appears to be no consensus favorite among social conservatives heading into the state's Republican caucuses on Saturday.

Mitt: Bringing Sexy Back? 
[Buzzfeed, 3/1/12] You can say a lot of things about Mitt Romney, but this strange sign might not be the most accurate.

 

Strong Views of Gingrich in Georgia District He Represented  
[Wall Street Journal, 3/2/12] Memories of Gingrich are vivid in Carrollton, Ga., part of the congressional district the former House speaker represented. Some revere him as a brash visionary capable of transforming Washington; others think of him as a political opportunist who abandoned the town as well as his struggling ex-wife and daughters. 

DON'T MISS TODAY'S TOP STORIES
Sign up form for the newsletter

GOP Rivals Make Push in Georgia
[Atlanta Journal-Constitution, 3/2/12] Gingrich and Santorum, battling for the Peach State’s 76 GOP delegates, brought their cases to metro Atlanta voters on Thursday, while Romney reached out to Georgia voters through a surrogate: his wife, Ann.

Ohio Donations Fuel Santorum’s Primary Run
[Columbus Dispatch, 3/2/12] Ohio donations to Santorum’s presidential campaign jumped to more than $65,000 in January, the most any Republican White House hopeful mined from the Buckeye State in that month. The $65,789 that Santorum reaped in Ohio was more than six times what the former Pennsylvania senator got, total, between Oct. 1 and Dec. 31 of last year.

In Michigan, Romney Backer Decries Change to Delegate Count
[Detroit Free Press, 3/1/12] Mike Cox, the former attorney general for Michigan and a member of the committee that changed the rules to award Romney an extra delegate, said that the committee was “absolutely wrong” to make the change, even though he wanted Romney to win. “I have this crazy idea that you follow the rules,” said Cox,who voted against the rule change. Santorum backers are protesting the outcome.

10 Questions With Rick Santorum
[New York Times, 3/1/12] The candidate sat down with The Times’ John Harwood and delved into substantive issues like bringing back manufacturing, tax policy, and his belief that capitalism encourages morality. He also attempted to clarify earlier remarks about the unemployment rate, gas prices, and the 2008 financial crisis. Includes full video.

Romney Reopens Whatever-It-Takes Playbook
[New York Times, 3/1/12] Romney is proving unusually adept at defining, diminishing, and disqualifying his GOP rivals through relentless attacks. But as successful as this strategy has been, it has also raised questions about Romney’s negative campaign and ferocious, whatever-it-takes style.

To Residents of Another Washington, Their Cherished Values Are Under Assault
[Washington Post, 3/1/12] Oklahoma will hold its Republican primary on Super Tuesday, bringing the cultural debate over the heart of conservatism to the conservative heartland. The Post talks to residents about their hopes and fears in rural, tradition-bound and nearly all-white Washington.

Blunt Force Trauma: Romney Grants Dems’ Wish on Contraception
[Talking Points Memo, 3/2/12] Romney’s Michigan victory speech earlier this week showed a candidate desperate to avoid social issues and focus on the economy. That plan unraveled just a day later, thanks to Senate Republicans and a local Ohio news reporter—and the results have been a boon to Democrats. Watch Jon Stewart on Thursday submitting a new measure of time to the Oxford English Dictionary—"the Romney."

Romney Campaign Turns to Shallow Donors
[Los Angeles Times, 3/2/12] After locking up much of the GOP establishment’s heavyweight fundraisers, Romney's campaign is looking to the little guy for new sources of cash.

Huntsman Dropped From RNC Event for 'Third Party' Call
[BuzzFeed, 3/2/12]  Somebody at the RNC was apparently less-than-pleased with Jon Huntsman’s recent calls for a third party to jump into the presidential race—the former candidate and putative Romney-backer has been dropped as a speaker from a donors’ event in Palm Beach, Fla., this weekend, a source tells BuzzFeed.

Gingrich Goes After Santorum on Labor
[National Journal, 3/2/12] On Friday, Gingrich launches his first paid attack against Santorum in the form of 150,000 robocalls to voters in Tennessee and Oklahoma that accuse his rival of pandering to labor unions.

Romney Finds Double Dose of Tennessee Support
[Commercial Appeal, 3/2/12] Much of Tennessee’s political establishment has endorsed Mitt Romney, but many of these supporters still think it would be a "major surprise" if he wins the primary on Tuesday, the Memphis paper reports. If he does, he'll have done so thanks in no small part to Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam and the influential network that helped elect Haslam governor.

Gingrich Leaves Trail of Debts, Lawsuits, and Bankruptcies in His Wake
[Huffington Post, 3/2/12] A lengthy investigation by the website finds a previously unexplored side of Newt Gingrich’s career: “a striking pattern of financial mismanagement at the political and nonprofit groups that Gingrich has created, steered, and abandoned over the past 30 years.”

Campaigns Can Push Mega Donors' Pet Causes  
[Politico, 3/2/12] If the GOP presidential primary were defined by its biggest donors, it would be about a host of other things besides the economy—like creating floating cities, containing Sharia law, protecting landowners from oil spills, and defending Israel.

 

Attend a National Journal LIVE event | Sign up for National Journal newsletters

DON'T MISS TODAY'S TOP STORIES

Sign up form for the newsletter
Comments
comments powered by Disqus
 
MORE NATIONAL JOURNAL