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Gender and Class Could Decide S.C. Gender and Class Could Decide S.C.

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The Trail: 2012 Presidential News from the Field

CAMPAIGN 2012

Gender and Class Could Decide S.C.

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The South Carolina flag adopted in 1861 by the General Assembly after South Carolina seceded from the Union in flies over Fort Moultrie on Sullivans Island, S.C., on Friday, Jan. 28, 2011, the 150th anniversary of the flag's adoption. The crescent on the flag points up, rather than at an angle as the current state flag. (AP Photo/Bruce Smith)(Bruce Smith/AP)

ORANGEBURG, S.C. – The result in today’s critical South Carolina primary could turn on whether gender or class exerts a bigger influence on the outcome. The more class shapes the outcome, the better the odds for Newt Gingrich; for Mitt Romney, the same is true of gender.

Gender has not been a big factor in the Republican presidential race so far. But with all signs indicating that Gingrich has enjoyed a surge of support here after two strong debate performances this week, Romney advisers and independent analysts alike say the one factor most likely to save Romney would be a tilt away from Gingrich among women, after the explosive allegations aired by his ex-wife Marianne on Thursday.

 

“It looked like men are splitting and then we’re doing extremely well with women,” said one top Romney aide. “We’ve got to drive women to the polls. We’ve just got to increase our numbers among women.” Read more

–Ronald Brownstein

 

NATIONAL JOURNAL’S SOUTH CAROLINA REPORT

South Carolina Could Turn on Race or Gender
The result in today’s critical South Carolina primary could turn on whether gender or class exerts a bigger influence on the outcome. One helps Gingrich, the other Romney. 

The Color Line
Race is central to the clash between Democrats and Republicans over taxes and spending, which is why the nation’s politics may increasingly resemble those in South Carolina, as National Journal’s Ron Brownstein reports.

Romney’s Support Dropping Nationally
The recent anti-Mitt Romney contagion is spreading beyond South Carolina. Gallup's tracking poll of the Republican race shows Romney has watched his national lead among Republicans erode this week, as National Journal’s Alex Roarty reports.

 

Santorum Declared Winner in Iowa
No tie in Iowa. Rick Santorum has now been declared the winner of the state's Jan. 3 caucus. 

Gingrich Foreign Policy ‘Dangerously Unpredictable’
Gingrich’s conception of the world “seems to have little ideological underpinning beyond a love of his own cleverness and a compulsive need to look smarter than the other guy,” argues Max Fisher in The Atlantic.

Gingrich Elaborates on Angry Response to Ex-Wife’s Allegations
In a CNN interview, Newt Gingrich continued to try to turn his ex-wife's televised interview about his infidelity to his advantage. 

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Romney to Gingrich: Release Freddie Mac Report
Opening up a new line of attack against Gingrich, Romney on Saturday called on his rival to release a report detailing the work he did for the mortgage giant. 

Weather Service: Possible S.C. Tornados
A Tornado Watch has been issued for much of South Carolina's Midlands region on Saturday as Republicans there go to the polls 

A Tale of Two Surrogates
Two prominent Republican governors stood on stage and praised Romney, but only one said they weren't interested in being a running mate. 

Romney Will Debate on Monday
Mitt Romney and the rest of the GOP presidential field have confirmed their attendance at Monday night's debate, after some initial uncertainties.  

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